Literature

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1. General summaries on vines

  1. Fernald, M. L. 1950. Gray’s Manual of Botany, 8th ed. New York: American Book Company.
  2. Heywood, V.H. 1993. Flowering Plants of the World. London: B.T. Batsford.
  3. Seymour, E.L.D., Ed. 1946. The New Garden Encyclopedia New York, NY: Wm. H. Wise & Co.
  4. Wood A.M. 1854. A Class-Book of Botany. Manufacturing Company, Claremont, NH.

2. Floras with species lists

  1. Bardertscher, K.B. & S.E. Newman 2006. Edible Flowers. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension no. 7.327. http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/Garden/07237.html
  2. Barnes, B., C.W. Dick & M. Gunn (n.d.). Hanes Foundation: Request of support to acquire illustrations for a new book entitled Michigan Shrubs and Vines. University of Michigan Press.
  3. Barnes, B.V. & W.H. Wagner 1981. Michigan Trees: A guide to the trees of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.
  4. Barnes, B.V. & W.H. Wagner 1992. Michigan Trees: A guide to the trees of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.
  5. Biggerstaff, M.S. & C.W. Beck 2007. Effects of method of English ivy removal and seed addition on regeneration of vegetation in a southeastern piedmont forest. The American Midland Naturalist 158: 206-220.
  6. Billington, C. 1943. Shrubs of Michigan. Bloomfield Hills, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science.
  7. Braun, E.L. 1967. The Woody Plants of Ohio: Trees, shrubs, and woody climbers, native, naturalized, and escaped. Columbus, OH; The Ohio State University Press.
  8. Bryson, C.T. & M.S. DeFelice. 2009. Weeds of the South. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press.
  9. Climbing Bittersweet, Celastrus scandens. Last modified: 2006. http://www.fcps.edu/StratfordLandingES/Ecology/mpages/climbing_bittersweet.htm (Link deprecated)
  10. Cooperrider, T.S. 1995. The Dicotyledons of Ohio: Linaceae Through Campanulaceae. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press.
  11. Croat, T. 1978. Flora of Barro Colorado Island. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  12. de Selm, H.R. 1957. A key to the native and naturalized climbing plants of Ohio based upon vegetative characteristics. The Ohio Journal of Science 57(5): 285-289.
  13. Diggs, G.M., Jr., B.L. Lipscomb and R.J. O’Kennon 1999. Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas. Fort Worth, TX: Botanical Research Institute.
  14. Dufour, A. 1902. Climbing Plants of Ohio. The Ohio Naturalist 2(4): 197-200.
  15. Evergreen Native Plant Database. 2002-2007. http://www.evergreen.ca/nativeplants/search/printable-list.php
  16. Fishel, F. & A. Kendig 2003. Vine weeds of Missouri. MU Extension, University of Missouri-Columbia, IPM1021.
  17. Foote, L.E., and S.B. Jones Jr. 1989. Native Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Southeast: Landscaping Uses and Identification. Portland, OR: Timber Press.
  18. Foster, C. & C. Hamel 2006. Rare Species Surveys of the Manitoba Conservation Data Centre. MS Report 06-01. Manitoba Conservation Data Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
  19. Gill, D.J. & A.D. Owings (n.d.). Groundcovers and vines for Louisiana landscapes. Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Pub. 2641.
  20. Gleason, H. A. 1963. Illustrated Flora of the Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada, Volume 2. New York, NY: Hafner Publishing Company, Inc.
  21. Gleason, H.A. 1963. The New Britton and Brown Illustrated Flora of the Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. New York, NY: Hafner Publishing Co., Inc.
  22. Gleason, H.A., & A. Cronquist 1963. Manual of Vascular Plants of the Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. Princeton, NJ: D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc.
  23. Gleason, H.A., & A. Cronquist 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of the Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. Bronx, NY: New York Botanical Garden Press.
  24. Godfrey, R.K. 1988. Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of Northern Florida and Adjacent Georgia and Alabama. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press.
  25. Hardy C.R. & N.W. Hardy 2008. Simple biodiversity mashups for non-tech-savvy biologists: a demonstration using the liana flora of Pennsylvania, USA. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 135(4): 585-594.
  26. Henry, R.D. & A.R. Scott 1981. Time of introduction of the alien component of the spontaneous Illinois vascular flora. American Midland Naturalist 106(2): 318-324.
  27. Hitchcock, C.L. and A. Cronquist. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.
  28. Holmes, R.T. & G.E. Likens 1999. Organisms of the Hubbard Brook Valley, New Hampshire. Gen. Tech. Rep NE-257. Departmernt of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station.
  29. Lauderdale, C. & E. Evans (n.d.). Edible Flowers. North Carolina State University Horticulture Information Leaflets 1/99 HIL-8513. http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8513.html
  30. Magee, D.W., & H.E. Ahles 1942. Flora of the Northeast: A Manual of the Vascular Flora of New England and Adjacent New York. University of Massachusetts Press.
  31. Major J., A. DiTommaso, J. Lehmann, & N.P.S. Falcão 2005. Weed dynamics on Amazonian Dark Earth and adjacent soils of Brazil. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 111: 1-12.
  32. Mallick, M.A.B. & E.L. Rice 1966. Relation between soil fungi and seed plants in three successional forest communities in Oklahoma. Botanical Gazette 127(2/3): 120-127.
  33. McGregor, R.L. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: The University Press of Kansas.
  34. Neal, J.C. & R.H. Uva (n.d.). WeedFacts #4. Woody Weeds of Nursery and Landscape; Identification and Control.
  35. Nichols, G.E. 1916. The vegetation of Connecticut. V. Plant societies along rivers and streams. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 43(5): 235-264.
  36. Parkhurst, H.E. 1903. Trees, shrubs and vines of the northeastern United States. New York, NY: C. Scribner’s Sons.
  37. Petrides, G.A., & J. Wehr 1988. Eastern Trees. Peterson Field Guides. Houghton Mifflin Company, New York.
  38. Radford, A.E., H.E. Ahles, & C.R. Bell 1968. Manual of the Vascular Flora of the Carolinas. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press.
  39. Smith, Jr., J.P. 2003. Floras of North America. Humbold State University Herbarium. Miscellaneous Publication No. 5 (Eighth Edition).
  40. Steere, W.C., Ed. 1966. Wild Flowers of the United States, Volume Three. New York, NY: The New York Botanical Garden Press.
  41. Stephens, H.A. 1969. Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines in Kansas. Lawrence, KS: The Regents Press of Kansas.
  42. Stupka, A. 1964. Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Knoxville, TN: The University of Tennessee Press.
  43. Tillman, O.I. 1905. Ohio plants with tendrils. The Ohio Naturalist 5(5): 305-307.
  44. Uva, R., J.C. Neal, & J.M. DiTomaso 1997. Weeds of the Northeast. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  45. Voss, E.G. 1972. Michigan Flora Part I: Gymnosperms and Monocots. Ann Arbor, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science.
  46. Voss, E.G. 1985. Michigan Flora Part II: Dicots. Ann Arbor, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science.
  47. Voss, E.G. 2004. Michigan Flora Part III: Dicots Concluded. Ann Arbor, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science.
  48. Yost, S.E., S. Antenen, & G. Hartvigsen 1991. The vegetation of the Wave Hil. Natural Area, Bronx, New York. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 118(3): 312-325.

3. Candidates for vine sites

  1. Robertson, D.J., M.C. Robertson, & T. Tague 1994. Colonization dynamics of four exotic plants in a northern Piedmont natural area. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 121(2):107-118. 

4. Biological information on vine species

  1. Aarssen, L.W., I.V. Hall, & K.I.N. Jensen 1985. The biology of Canadian weeds. 76. Vicia angustifolia L., V. cracca L., V. sativa L., V. tetrasperma (L.) Schreb. and V. villosa Roth. Canadian Journal of Plant Science 66: 711-737.
  2. Albrecht, M.A. & B.C. McCarthy 2005. Seed germination and dormancy in the medicinal woodland herbs Collinsonia canadensis L. (Lamiaceae) and Dioscorea villosa L. (Dioscoreaceae). Flora 201: 24-31.
  3. Arber, A. 1920. Tendrils of Smilax. Botanical Gazette 69(5): 438-442.
  4. (no author), (n.d.). Baystar vine. Gulf South Research Corporation. http://www.gsrcorp.com/tes/SCGL7/scgl7_text.html (Link deprecated)
  5. Ballelli, S. 2013. Calystegia hederacea Wall. (Convolvulaceae), a random exotic species, new for Italy. Webbia 68(1):63-65.
  6. Bergmann, C. & J.M. Swearingen 2006. Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata (Willd.) Maesen and Almeida. PCA Alien Plant Working Group. http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/pumo1.htm
  7. Boss, P.K. & M.R. Thomas 2002. Association of dwarfism and floral induction with a grape ‘green revolution’ mutation. Nature 416: 847-850.
  8. Bowling, A.J. & K.C. Vaughn 2009. Gelatinous fibers are widespread in coiling tendrils and twining vines. American Journal of Botany 96(4): 719-727.
  9. Brand, M.H. 1997-2001. Parthenocissus tricuspidata. UConn Plant Database. http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/p/partri/partri1.html
  10. Brightmore, D. & P.H.F. White 1963. Lathyrus Japonicus Willd. Journal of Ecology 51(3): 795-801.
  11. Brothers, T.S. & A. Spingarn 1992. Forest fragmentation and alien plant invasion of central Indiana old-growth forests. Conservation Biology 6(1): 91-100.
  12. Brown, A.H. 1993. Circumnutations: from Darwin to space flights. Plant Physiol. 101: 345-348.
  13. Carpenter, A. 2001. The vine that twines. Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine. http://dnr.wi.gov/wnrmag/html/stories/2001/oct01/vine.htm
  14. Carroll, S.P., J.E. Loye, H. Dingle, M. Mathieson, T.R. Famula, & M.P. Zalucki 2005. And the beak shall inherit – evolution in response to invasion. Ecology Letters 8: 944-951.
  15. Cartwright, J. 2006. Climbing plants get wrapped up. Physics Web. http://physicsweb.org/articles/news/10/11/13/1
  16. Ceska, A. 1999. Rubus armeniacus – A correct name for Himalayan blackberry. Botanical eletronic news 230.
  17. Cornejo, F., & J. Janovec 2010. Seeds of Amazonian Plants. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  18. Defelice, M.S. 2001. Tall morningglory, Ipomoea purpurea (L.) Roth—flower or foe? Weed Technology 15: 601-606.
  19. den Dubbelden, K.C. & B. Oosterbeek 1995. The availability of external support affects allocation patterns and morphology of herbaceous climbing plants. Functional Ecology 9(4): 628-634.
  20. Emery, T. 2007. In Tennessee, goats eat the ‘vine that ate the South’. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/05/us/05goats.html?ei=5070&en&_r=0
  21. Ergaschewa, G.N. & W. Drauschke 2005. Degree of adaptation of lianas (Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) and Campsis radicans (L.)) to the environmental conditions of towns. Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics 106(1): 79-85.
  22. Esbenshade, W. R., & W. S. Curran. 1999. Effect of Emergence Date and Corn Competition on Burcucumber Fecundity. NEWSS 53:22.
  23. Ford, E. & C. Purrington 2003. Determinants of handedness in twining vines. http://www.swarthmore.edu/NatSci/SigmaXi/docs/PosterSummaries2003/ford-emily.pdf
  24. Forseth, Jr., I.N. & A.F. Innis 2004. Kudzu (Pueraria montana): history, physiology, and ecology combine to make a major ecosystem threat. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 23(5): 401-413.
  25. Fukuhara, T. 1999. Seed and funicle morphology of Fumariaceae-Fumarioideae: Systematic implications and evolutionary patters. International Journal of Plant Sciences 160(1): 151-180.
  26. Gianoli, E., Molina-Montenegro, M.A., J. Becerra 2006. Interactive effects of leaf damage, light intensity and support availability on chemical defenses and morphology of a twining vine. J. Chem. Ecol. 33: 95-103.
  27. Goriely, A. & S. Neukirch 2006. Mechanics of climbing and attachment in twining plants. Physical Review Letters 97: 184302-184304.
  28. Guertin, P. & W.L. Halvorson 2003. Factsheet for: Ipomoea purpurea (L.) Roth. USGS Weeds in the West project: Status of Introduced Plants in Southern Arizona Parks.
  29. Hashimoto, T. 2002. Molecular genetic analysis of left–right handedness in plants. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 357: 799–808.
  30. Hauser, E.J.P. 1965. The Caprifoliaceae of Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science 65(3): 118-129.
  31. Hendricks, H.V. 1919. Torsion studies in twining plants. Botanical Gazette 68(6): 425-440.
  32. Hendricks, H.V. 1923. Torsion studies in twining plants. II. Botanical Gazette 75(3): 282-297.
  33. Higgins, T.J. & T. Khan 1998. PR-96: Field evaluation of transgenic lines of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) for resistance to Ascochyta blight. CSIRO Plant Industry.
  34. Holmes, W.C. 2003. Flora of North America, Vol. 26. 227. Smilacaceae Ventenat. http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=130567
  35. Humphrey, L.E. 1914. The honeysuckle family in Ohio. The Ohio Naturalist 14(6): 299-308.
  36. Invasive Alien Plant Species of Virginia. Porcelain-berry. Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia (n.d.).
  37. Jensen, M.N. 1998. Mathematicians describe tendril perversion. Science News 153(9): 134.
  38. Johnsson, A. 1977. Circumnutations under free-fall conditions in space. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences 199(1137): 505-512.
  39. Judd, W.S. 1998. Smilacaceae in the southeastern United States. Harvard Papers in Botany 3(2):147-169
  40. Keener, C.S. & W.M. Dennis 1981. The subgeneric classification of Clematis (Ranunculaceae) in temperate North America north of Mexico. Taxon 31(1): 37-44.
  41. Kitazawa, D., Y. Hatakeda, M. Kamada, N. Fujii, Y. Miyazawa, A. Hoshino, S. Iida, H. Fukaki, M.T. Morita, M. Tasaka, H. Suge, & H. Takahashi 2005. Shoot circumnutation and winding movements require gravisensing cells. PNAS 102(51): 18742-18747.
  42. Krings, A. & R.J. Richardson 2006. Cayratia japonica (Vitaceae) new to North Carolina and updated key to the genera of Vitaceae in the Carolinas. SIDA 22(1): 813-815.
  43. Krings, A. 2004. Abaxial foliar vestiture of Desmodium Desv. (Fabaceae) in North Carolina and vegetative recognition of the species. Vulpia 3: 140-172.
  44. Lacroix, C.L. & U. Posluszny 1989. Phyllotactic patterns in some members of the Vitaceae. Botanical Gazette 150(3): 303-313.
  45. Lageland, K.A., Stocker, R.K., & D.M. Brazis 2006. Natural area weeds: Skunkvine (Paederia foetida). Agronomy Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, SS-AGR-80.
  46. Larson, K.C. 2000. Circumnutation behavior of an exotic honeysuckle vine and its native congener: influence on clonal mobility. American Journal of Botany 87(4): 533-538.
  47. Lawson, C.A. 1973. The genus Galium (Rubiaceae) in Oklahoma. The Southwestern Naturalist 18(1): 45-72.
  48. Leicht-Young, S.A., N.B. Pavlovic, R. Grundel, & K.J. Frohnapple 2007. Distinguishing native (Celastrus scandens L.) and invasive (C. orbiculatus Thunb.) bittersweet species using morphological characteristics. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 134(4): 441-450.
  49. Lersten, N.R., L. Krueger, & J.D. Curtis 2002. Tracheoid variation among Bignoniaceae seed wings, with emphasis on Campsis radicans. Int. J. Plant Sci. 163(3): 369-378.
  50. Lindley, D. 2006. String theory for plants. Physical Review Focus. http://physics.aps.org/story/v18/st15
  51. Lisk, H. 1924. Cellular structure of tendrils. Botanical Gazette 78: 85-102.
  52. Ma, J. & G. Moore (n.d.). Celastrus scandens L. Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Brooklyn, NY.
  53. Markmann, C. & R. Maruchia 2006. Summary of dodder (Cuscuta japonica) biology, concerns, and management.
  54. Matthews, K.G., N. Dunne, E. York, & L. Struwe 2009. A phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of Bartonia (Gentianaceae: Gentianeae), based on molecular and morphological evidence. Systematic Botany 34(1):162-172.
  55. Messersmith, D.T., & W.S. Curran 1996. Burcucumber Biology and Management in Corn. Proc. NEWSS 50:71.
  56. McConnaughay, K.D.M. & F.A. Bazzaz 1987. The relationship between gap size and performance of several colonizing annuals. Ecology 68(2): 411-416.
  57. McDonald, R.I. & D.L. Urban 2006. Edge effects on species composition and exotic species abundance in the North Carolina Piedmont. Biological Invasions 8: 1049-1060.
  58. Mitich, L.W. 2000. Kudzu [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi]. Weed Technology 14: 231-235.
  59. Mohan, J., et. al 2006. Biomass and Toxicity Responses of Poison-ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to Elevated Atmospheric CO2. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 103:9086-9089
  60. Morisawa, T.L. 1999. Weed Notes: Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench. The Nature Conservancy. http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu
  61. Muir, J.P. & W.D. Pitman 1989. Response of the Florida legume Galactia elliottii to shade. Agroforestry Systems 9: 233-239.
  62. Neukirch, S. & A. Goriely (n.d.). Climbing plants: how thick should their supports be? Université Paris 6 & University of Arizona. PowerPoint Presentation.
  63. O’Driscoll, C.W. 2003. Preliminary review of the genus Cuscuta in North America prepared for the NAPPO PRA Panel – July / August 2003. Pest Risk Assessment Unit, Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
  64. Ogden, J. 1978. Variation in Calystegia R.Br. (Convolvulaceae) in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 16: 123-140.
  65. Ordway, E., S.L. Buchmann, R.O. Kuehl, and C.W. Shipman 1987. Pollen dispersal in Cucurbita foetidissima (Cucurbitaceae) by bees of the genera Apis, Peponapis and Xenoglossa (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Anthophoridae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 60(4): 489-503
  66. Pavlovic, N.B., S.A. Leicht-Young, R. Grundel, & K.J. Frohnapple (n.d.). American and Oriental bittersweet identification. USGS.
  67. Pogge, F.L. & B.C. Bearce 1989. Germinating common and cat greenbrier. Tree Planters’ Notes 40(1): 34-37.
  68. (no author), (n.d.). Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata (Willd.) Maesen and Almeida. Pp. 86-87.
  69. Puff, C. 1976. The Galium trifidum group (Galium sect. Aparinoides, Rubiaceae). Can. J. Bot. 54: 1911-1025.
  70. Puff, C. 1977. The Galium obtusum group (Galium sect. Aparinoides, Rubiaceae). Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 104(3): 202-208.
  71. Porter, D.M. 1971. Notes on the floral glands in Tribulus (Zygophyllaceae). Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 58(1): 1-5.
  72. Rafinesque 1836. New Flora of North America. Philadelphia.
  73. Raver, A. 2008. It eats CO2 for breakfast. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/17/garden/17garden.html?pagewanted=all
  74. Robertson, D.J., M.J. Robertson, & T. Tague 1994. Colonization dynamics of four exotic plants in a northern piedmont natural area. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 121(2): 107-118.
  75. Robocker, W.C. & H.D. Kerr 1964. Characteristics and herbicidal control of flat pea. Weeds 12(1): 40-42.
  76. Rodriguez-Pontes 2009. Seed formation and pollination systemin Cuscuta obtusiflora: First record of preanthesis cleistogamy in parasitic plants and some functional inferences. Flora 204: 228-237.
  77. Sanderson, L.A. & P.M. Antunes 2013. The exotic invasive plant Vincetoxicum rossicum is a strong competitor even outside its current realized climatic temperature range. NeoBiota 16:1-15.
  78. Sandler, H.A. 2001. Dodder. University of Massachusetts, Cranberry Experiment Station.
  79. Seefeldt, S.S., J.S. Conn, B.E. Jackson, & S.D. Sparrow 2007. Response of seedling bird vetch (Vicia cracca) to six herbicides. Weed Technology 21: 692-694.
  80. Sengbusch, P.V. 1996-2004. Tendril movements. Botany PnlOne. http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/e32/32e.htm
  81. Sheeley, S.E. & D.J. Raynal 1996. The distribution and status of species of Vincetoxicum in eastern North America. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 123(2): 148-156.
  82. Sisterson, M.S. & F.L.Gould 1999. The inflated calyx of Physalis angulata: A refuge from parasitism for Heliothis subflexa. Ecology 80(3): 1071-1075.
  83. Soliman, I.E.  & A.M. Hamza 2010. Evaluation of some herbicides against flax dodder (Cuscuta epilinum Weihe) in fibre flax (Linum ustatissimum L. ) cultivation. Journal of Plant Protection Research 50(3):372-378.
  84. Soejima, A. & J. Wen 2006. Phyligenetic analysis of the grape family (Vitaceae) based on three chloroplast markers. American Journal of Botany 93(2): 278-287.
  85. Taneda, H. & M. Tateno 2007. Effects of transverse movement of water in xylem on patterns of water transport within current-year shoots of kudzu vine, Pueraria lobata. Functional Ecology 21: 226-234.
  86. Tenaglia, D. (n.d.). Duchesnea indica (Andr.) Focke. Missouri Plants. http://www.missouriplants.com/Yellowalt/Duchesnea_indica_page.html
  87. Tsugawa, H., M. Tange, R. Kobayashi, K. Nishikawa 1986. Development of root systemin one year old seedlings of kudzu vine (Pueraria lobata Ohwi). Sci. Rept. Fac. Agri. Kobe Univ. 17: 1-12.
  88. Tsugawa, H., T.W. Sasek, M. Tange, & K. Nishiwaka 1988. The fate of buds of kudzu-vine (Pueraria lobata Ohwi). J. Japan Grassl. Sci. 33(4): 321-331.
  89. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Staff 2006. Weed of the week: exotic Wisterias. http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants
  90. USDA NRCS Plant Materials Program 2002. Plant fact sheet: Common periwinkle. USDA NRCS Plant Materials Program (Link deprecated)
  91. Ushimaru, A. & K. Kikuzawa 1999. Variation of breeding system, floral rewards, and reproductive success in clonal Calystegia species (Convolvulaceae). American Journal of Botany 86(3): 436-446.
  92. Walker, J. 2005. Goriely and Neukirch explanation made simple by a physics page 1.207 Twining plants on a garden rod. http://www.flyingcircusofphysics.com
  93. Wilson, T. & U. Posluszny 2003. Complex tendril branching in two species of Parthenocissus: Implications for the vitaceous shoot architecture. Canadian Journal of Botany 81(6): 587-597.
  94. Wolgemuth C.W., R.E. Goldstein, T.R. Powers 2004. Dynamic supercoiling bifurcations of growing elastic filaments. Physica D 190: 266–289.
  95. Woods, M. 2005. A Revision of the North American species of Apios (Fabaceae). Castanea 70(2): 85-100.
  96. Young, J.A., & C.G. Young 1992. Seeds of Woody Plants in North America. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press.
  97. Yuncker, T.G. 1921. The genus Cuscuta in Michigan. Mich. Acad. Sci. Arts & Letters Papers 1: 185-189.
  98. Yurkones, K.A. & S.J. Meiners 2004. Invasion impacts local species turnover in a successional system. Ecology Letters 7: 764-769.
  99. Zheng, H., Y. Wu, J. Ding, D. Binion, W. Fu, & R. Reardon 2006. Invasive Plants of Asian Origin Established in the United States and Their Natural Enemies, Volume 1. Akebia kinata. USDA Forest Service. Pp. 13-14.

5. Climbing mechanisms

  1. Allard, H.A. 1947. The direction of twist of the corolla in the bud, and twining of the stems in Convolvulaceae and Dioscoreaceae. Castanea 12(3): 88-94.
  2. Arber, A. 1920. Tendrils of Smilax. Botanical Gazette 69(5): 438-442.
  3. Blechert, S., C. Bockelmann, M. Füsslein, T.V. Schrader, B. Stelmach, U. Niesel, & E.W. Weiler 1999. Structure-activity analyses reveal the existence of two separate groups of active octadecanoids in elicitation of the tendril-coiling response of Bryonia dioica Jacq. Planta 207(3): 470-479.
  4. Boss, K.B. 2002. Association of dwarfism and floral induction with a grape ‘green revolution’ mutation. Nature 416: 847-850.
  5. Bowling, A.J. & K.C. Vaughn 2009. Gelatinous fibers are widespread in coiling tendrils and twining vines. American Journal of Botany 96(4): 719-727.
  6. Brown, A.H. 1993. Circumnutations: from Darwin to space flights. Plant Physiol. 101: 345-348.
  7. Carter, G.A. & A.H. Teramura 1988. Vine photosynthesis and relationships to climbing mechanics in a forest understory. American Journal of Botany 75(7): 1011-1018.
  8. Cartwright, J. 2006. Climbing plants get wrapped up. Physics Web. http://physicsweb.org/articles/news/10/11/13/1
  9. Darwin, C. 1864. The Movement and Habit of Climbing Plants. The Linnaean Society.
  10. den Dubbelden, K.C. & B. Oosterbeek 1995. The availability of external support affects allocation patterns and morphology of herbaceous climbing plants. Functional Ecology 9(4): 628-634.
  11. Edwards, W., A.T. Moles, & P. Franks 2007. The global trend in plant twining direction. Global Ecology and Biogeography 16: 795-800.
  12. Engelberth, J., G. Wanner, B. Groth, & E.W. Weiler 1995.Functional anatomy of the mechanoreceptor cells in tendrils of Bryonia dioica. Planta 196( 3): 539-550.
  13. Ford, E. & C. Purrington 2003. Determinants of handedness in twining vines. http://www.swarthmore.edu/NatSci/SigmaXi/docs/PosterSummaries2003/ford-emily.pdf
  14. Goriely, A. & S. Neukirch 2006. Mechanics of climbing and attachment in twining plants. Physical Review Letters 97: 184302-184304.
  15. Hashimoto, T. 2002. Molecular genetic analysis of left–right handedness in plants. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 357: 799-808.
  16. Hendricks, H.V. 1919. Torsion studies in twining plants. Botanical Gazette 68(6): 425-440.
  17. Hendricks, H.V. 1923. Torsion studies in twining plants. II. Botanical Gazette 75(3): 282-297.
  18. Jensen, M.N. 1998. Mathematicians describe tendril perversion. Science News 153(9): 134.
  19. Johnsson, A. 1977. Circumnutations under free-fall conditions in space? Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences 199(1137): 505-512.
  20. Kitazawa, D., Y. Hatakeda, M. Kamada, N. Fujii, Y. Miyazawa, A. Hoshino, S. Iida, H. Fukaki, M.T. Morita, M. Tasaka, H. Suge, and H. Takahashi 2005. Shoot circumnutation and winding movements require gravisensing cells. PNAS 102(51): 18742-18747.
  21. Larson, K.C. 2000. Circumnutation of an exotic honeysuckle vine and its native congener: influence of clonal mobility. American Journal of Botany 87(4): 533–538.
  22. Leicht-Young, S.A., N.B. Pavlovic, R. Grundel, & K.J. Frohnapple 2007. Distinguishing native (Celastrus scandens L.) and invasive (C. orbiculatus Thunb.) bittersweet species using morphological characteristics. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 134(4): 441-450.
  23. Lindley, D. 2006. String Theory for plants. Physical Review Focus. http://focus.aps.org/story/v18/st15
  24. Lisk, H. 1924. Cellular structure of tendrils. Botanical Gazette 78: 85-102.
  25. Neukirch, S. & A. Goriely (n.d.). Climbing plants: how thick should their supports be? Universite Paris & University of Arizona. PowerPoint Presentation.
  26. Pavlovic, N.B., S.A. Leicht-Young, R. Grundel, & K.J. Frohnapple (n.d.). American and Oriental bittersweet identification. USGS.
  27. Sengbusch, P.V. 1996-2004. Tendril movements. Botany online. http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/e32/32e.htm
  28. Walker, J. 2008. Twining plants on a garden rod. www.flyingcircusofphysics.com
  29. Wilson, T. & U. Posluszny 2003. Complex tendril branching in two species of Parthenocissus: implications for the vitaceous shoot architecture. Canadian Journal of Botany 81(6): 587-597.
  30. Wolgemuth, C.W., R.E. Goldstein, T.R. Powers 2004. Dynamic supercoiling bifurcations of growing elastic filaments. Physica D 190: 266-289.

6. Ecology and succession

  1. Allen, B.P., E.F. Pauley, R.R. Sharitz 1997. Hurricane impacts on liana populations in an old-growth southeastern bottomland forest. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 124(1): 34-42.
  2. Baker, M.E. & M.J. Wiley 2004. Characterization of woody species distribution in riparian forests of lower Michigan, USA using map-based models. Wetlands 24(3): 550-561.
  3. Beatley, J.C. 1956. Thw winter-green herbaceous flowering plants of Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science 56(6): 349-377.
  4. Bushnell, O.A. & W.B. Sarles 1937. Studies on the root-nodule bacteria of wild leguminous plants in Wisconsin. Soil Science 44(6): 409-423.
  5. Gilliam, F.S. 2007. The ecological significance of the herbaceous layer in temperate forest ecosystems. BioScience 57(10): 845-858.
  6. Hardin, E.D. 1988. Succession in Buffalo Beats Prairie and surrounding forest. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 115(1): 13-24.
  7. Hill, D. B. 1998. Pollination and honey production in the forest and agroforest. Proceedings of the Center for Integrated Natural Resources and Agricultural Management 1 (4): 136-141.
  8. Honu, Y.A.K. & D.J. Gibson 2006. Microhabitat factors and the distribution of exotic species across forest edges in temperate deciduous forest of southern Illinois, USA. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 133(2): 255-266.
  9. Hotchkiss, E.E., A. DiTommaso, D.C. Brainard, & C.L. Mohler 2008. Survival and performance of the invasive vine Vincetoxicum rossicum (Apocynaceae) from seeds of different embryo number under two light environments. American Journal of Botany 95(4): 447-453.
  10. (no author) 2009. Invasive plant species takes root in Canada. CBC News. http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2009/09/23/leamington-kudzu-092309.html
  11. Korschgen, L.J., W.R. Porath, & O. Torgerson 1980. Spring and summer foods of deer in the Missouri Ozarks. The Journal of Wildlife Management 44(1): 89-97.
  12. Penfound, W.T., J.S. Shed, & M.C. Jennison. 1964. A plant community dominated by vines. Proceedings of the Oklahoma Academy of Sciences 45: 41-43.
  13. Penfound, W.T., M.C. Jennison, J.S. Shed 1964. Replacement of a population of Johnson grass by a vine-forb community. Proceedings of the Oklahoma Academy of Sciences 45: 40-41.
  14. Penfound, W.T. 1966. The roles of vines in plant communities. Advancing Frontiers in Plant Sciences 17: 187-192.
  15. Pennings, S.C., R.M. Callaway 2002. Parasitic plants: parallels and contrasts with herbivores. Oecologia 131: 479-489.
  16. Rubino, D.L. & B.C. McCarthy 2004. Presence of aposematic (warning) coloration in vascular plants of southeastern Ohio. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 131(3): 252-256.
  17. Sheeley, S.E. & D.J. Raynal 1996. The distribution and status of species of Vincetoxicum in eastern North America. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 123(2): 148-156.
  18. Shifley, S.R. & J.M. Kabrick 2002. Proceedings of the Second Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project Symposium: Post-treatment Results of the Landscape Experiment. North Central Research Station, Forest Service, USDA.
  19. Smith, L.L., A. DiTommaso, J. Lehmann, & S. Greipsson 2006. Growth and reproductive potential of the invasive exotic vine Vincetoxicum rossicum in northern New York state. Can. J. Bot. 84: 1771-1780.
  20. (no author) 2009. Smothering vine that snaps hydro poles now in Canada. The Canadian Press. http://www.ctvnews.ca/smothering-vine-that-snaps-hydro-poles-now-in-canada-1.437131
  21. Whigham, D.F. 2004. Ecology of woodland herbs in temperate deciduous forests. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst. 35: 583-621.

7. Temperate vine systematics and identification

  1. Alice, L.A. & C.S. Campbell 1999. Phylogeny of Rubus (Rosaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region sequences. American Journal of Botany 86(1): 81-97.
  2. Angiosperm Phylogeny Group 2003. An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG II. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 141(4): 399-436.
  3. Broich, S.L. 2007. New combinations in North American Lathyrus and Vicia (Fabaceae: Faboideae: Fabeae). Madroño 54(1): 63-71.
  4. Brown, R.W. 1956. Composition of Scientific Words. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  5. DeFelice, M.S. 2002. Catchweed bedstraw or cleavers, Galium aparine L.— A very “sticky” subject. Weed Technology 16(2): 467-472.
  6. Horak, M.J. & L.M. Wax 1991. Germination and seedling development of bigroot morningglory (Ipomoea pandurata). Weed Science 39(3): 390-396.
  7. Jeffrey, C. & K. Kashyapa 1960. The identity and nomenclature of Thladiantha dubia (Cucurbitaceae) of the ‘Flora of British India’. Kew Bulletin 14(3): 461-463.
  8. Judd, W.S., C.S. Campbell, E.A. Kellogg, & P.F. Stevens 1999. Plant Systematics: A Phylogenetic Approach. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc.
  9. Kim, M., J.H. Park, & C. Park 2000. Flavonoid chemistry of Fallopia section Fallopia (Polygonaceae). Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 28: 433-441.
  10. Levin, R.A., J.R. Shak, J.S. Miller, G. Barnardello, A.M. Venter 2007. Evolutionary relationships in Tribe Lycieae (Solanaceae). VI International Solanaceae Conference: Genomics Meets Biodiversity 745: 225-240.
  11. Lira, R., J.L. Villasenor, & P.D. Davila 1997. A cladistic analysis of the subtribe Sicyinae (Cucurbitaceae). Systematic Botany 22(3): 415-425.
  12. Mercer, T. 2003. Distributional characteristics of lianas: example of Hedera helix, Drayton Wood, Norwich. University of East Anglia, ENV 3F02 – Environmental Sciences Project.
  13. Miller, J.S., A. Kamath, & R.A. Levin 2009. Do multiple tortoises equal a hare? The utility of nine noncoding plastid regions for species-level phylogenetics in Tribe Lycieae (Solanaceae). Systematic Botany 34(4): 796-804.
  14. Nybom, H. & B.A. Schaal 1990. DNA “fingerprints” reveal genotypic distributions in natural populations of blackberries and raspberries (Rubus, Rosaceae). American Journal of Botany 77(7): 883-888.
  15. Okerman, A. 2000. Combating the “Ivy Desert”: The invasion of Hedera helix (English Ivy) in the Pacific Northwest United States. Student On-Line Journal 6(4): 1-10.
  16. Olmstead, R.G., L. Bohs, H.A. Migid, E. Santiago-Valentin, V.F. Garcia, S.M. Collier 2008. A molecular phylogeny of the Solanaceae. Taxon 57(4): 1159-1181.
  17. Stearn, W.T. 1992. Stearn’s Dictionary of Plant Names for Gardeners. London: Cassel Publishers Limited.
  18. Sun, J.H., Z. Li, D.K. Jewett, K.O. Britton, W.H. Ye, X. Ge 2005. Genetic diversity of Pueraria lobata (kudzu) and closely related taxa as revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat analysis. Weed Research 45: 255-260.
  19. Taylor, K. 1958. Galium aparine L. Journal of Ecology 87: 713-730.
  20. Wen, J. & R.K. Jansen 1995. Morphological and molecular comparisons of Campsis grandiflora and C. radicans (Bignoniaceae), an eastern Asian and eastern North American vicariad species pair. Pl. Syst. Evol. 196: 173-183.
  21. Zomlefer, W.B. 1994. Guide to Flowering Plant Families. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina.

8. Ethnobotany

  1. Afonin, A.N., S.L. Greene, N.I. Dzyubenko, & A.N. Frolov (eds.) 2008. Interactive Agricultural Ecological Atlas of Russia and Neighboring Countries. Economic Plants and their Diseases, Pests and Weeds. http://www.agroatlas.ru.
  2. Austin, D.F. 2000. Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis, Convolvulaceae) in North America – from medicine to menace. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 127(2):172-177.
  3. Badertscher, K.B. & S.E. Newman 2003. Edible Flowers. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension – Horticulture, no. 7.237 http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/Garden/07237.html
  4. Behre, K.E. 2007. Collected seeds and fruits from herbs as prehistoric food. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 17(1): 65-73.
  5. Carr, L.G. & C. Westley 1945. Surviving folktales and herbal lore among the Shinnecock Indians of Long Island. Journal of American Folklore 58(228): 113-123.
  6. Chandlera, R.F., L. Freeman, & S.N. Hooper 1979. Herbal remedies of the maritime Indians. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1: 49-68.
  7. Choi, J.W., H.J. Jung, K.T Lee, and H.J. Park. 2005. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the saponin and sapogenins obtained from the stem of Akebia quinata. Journal of Medicinal Food 8(1): 78-85.
  8. Conroy, T. 2002. Activity of vinorelbine in gastrointestinal cancers. Critical reviews in oncology/hematology 42(2): 173-178.
  9. Cook, S.L. 1930. The Ethnobotany of Jemez Indians. University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis.
  10. Cook, W. 1869. The Physiomedical Dispensatory. Medical Herbalism Journal. http://medherb.com/cook/html/RUBUS_STRIGOSUS.htm
  11. Core, E.L. 1967. Ethnobotany of the Southern Appalachian Aborigines. Economic Botany 21(3): 199-214.
  12. Costea, M. & F.J. Tardif 2006. The Biology of Canadian weeds. 133. Cuscuta campestris Yuncker, C. gronovii Willd. ex Schult., C. umbrosa Beyr. ex Hook., C. epithymum (L.) L. and C. epilinum Weihe. Canadian Journal of Plant Science 86(1): 293-316.
  13. Darias, V., D. Martín-Herrera, S. Abdala, & D. de la Fuente 2001. Plants used in urinary pathologies in the Canary Islands. Pharmaceutical Biology 39(3): 170-180.
  14. Dean, T. 2007. Stalking the Wild groundnut. Orion Magazine. http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/458/
  15. Drollinger, D., & C. Rodriguez 2008. Medicinal plants of the southwest. Mexico State University. http://medplant.nmsu.edu/buffalo.shtm
  16. Duke, J. A. 1981. Handbook of legumes of world economic importance. New York, NY: Plenum Press. p. 199-265
  17. Duke, J.A. Dr. Duke’s Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/
  18. Eisenman, S.W., D.E. Zaurov, & L. Struwe 2013. Medicinal Plants of Central Asia: Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. Springer: New York, Heidelberg, Dordretch, London.
  19. Elmore, F.H. 1944. Ethnobotany of the Navajo. Sante Fe, NM: School of American Research.
  20. Enneking, D. 1994. The toxicity of Vicia species and their utilization as grain legumes. Ph.D. (Ag.Sc.) thesis, University of Adelaide.
  21. Ghrabi, Z. 2005. A Guide to Medicinal Plants in North Africa: Rosa canina L. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources: Malaga, Spain. Pages 229-231.
  22. Grieve, M. 1971 A Modern Herbal. Vol. II New York, NY: Dover Publication, Inc.
  23. Grieve, M. 1971. A Modern Herbal. London, England: Dover Publications.
  24. Grubben, G.J.H. 2004. Plant Resources of Tropical Africa: Vegetables (PROTA 2), Vol. 2. PROTA. Accessed on Google Books.
  25. Hamel, P.B. & M.U. Chiltoskey 1975. Cherokee Plants and Their Uses – A 400 Year History. Sylva: Herald Publishing.
  26. Herrick, J.W. 1995. Iroquois Medical Botany. Syracuse, New York, USA: The Syracuse University Press.
  27. Lewis, H.B., R.S. Fajans, M.B. Esterer, C.W. Shen, and M. Oliphant 1948. The nutritive values of some legumes, Lathyrism in the rat. The sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus), Lathyrus sativus, Lathyrus cicera, and some other species of Lathyrus. The Journal of Nutrition 36(5): 537-559.
  28. Li, T.S.C. 2009. Chinese and Related North American Herbs: Phytopharmacology and Therapeutic Values. Second Edition. Boca Raton, Florida, USA: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.
  29. Łuczaj, L. 2012. Ethnobotanical review of wild edible plants of Slovakia. Acta Societatis Botanicorum Poloniae 81(4):245-255.
  30. Majester-Savornin, B., R. Elias, A.M. Diaz-Lanza, G. Balansard, M. Gasquet, & F. Delmas 1991. Saponins of the ivy plant, Hedera helix, and their leishmanicidic activity. Planta Med 57: 260-262.
  31. Ménan, H., J.T. Banzouzi, A. Hocquette, Y, Pélissier, Y. Blache, M. Koné, M. Mallié, L.A. Assi, and A. Valentin 2006. Antiplasmodial activity and cytotoxicity of plants used in West African traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 105(1-2): 131-136.
  32. Milliken, W. & B. Albert 1998. The use of medicinal plants by the Yanomami Indians of Brazil, Part II. Economic Botany 51(3): 264-278.
  33. Mitich, L.W. 2000. Kudzu [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi]. Weed Technology 14:231-235.
  34. Moerman, D. 2003. Native American Ethnobotany Database. http://herb.umd.umich.edu
  35. Plants For A Future, 1996-2012. http://www.pfaf.org/
  36. Reid, B. E. 1977. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts’ao. Taipei: Southern Materials Centre.
  37. Shi, S., D. Jiang, C. Dong, & P. Tu 2006. New phenolic glycosides from Clematis mandshurica. Helvetica Chimica Acta 89(5): 1023-1029.
  38. Tănase, M., C. Sand, & G. Ciortega 2012. The economic impact of Cuscuta: damages and usages. Revista Economică 6: 45-50.
  39. Tull, D. 1999. Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest. Austin, Texas, USA: University of Texas Press.
  40. Vestal, P.A. 1952. The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94.
  41. Vouldoukis, I., D. Lacan, C. Kamate, P. Coste, A. Calenda, D. Mazier, M. Conti, & B. Dugas 2004. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of a Cucumis melo LC. extract rich in superoxide dismutase activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 94(1): 67-75.
  42. Wang, L., D. Zhao, L. Di, T. Xu, X. Lin, B. Yang, X. Zhou, X. Yang, & Y. Liu 2011. The analgesic and anti-rheumatic effects of Thladiantha dubia fruit crude polysaccharide fraction in mice and rats. J. Ethnopharmacol. 137(3): 1381-1387.
  43. Weatherbee, E.E. & J.G. Bruce 1982. Edible Wild Plants A Guide to Collecting and Cooking. 2nd ed. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Weatherbee and Bruce.
  44. World Health Organization 1989. Medicinal Plants in China. Singapore, China: WHO Regional Publications.
  45. Wu, M.J., J.H. Yen, L. Wang, & C.Y. Weng 2004. Antioxidant activity of porcelainberry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim.) Trautv.). The American Journal of Chinese Medicine 32(5): 681-693.
  46. Zhu, Y-P. 1998. Chinese Materia Medica: Chemistry, Pharmacology and Applications. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Harwood Academic Publishers.

9. Invasive Species

  1. Herron, P.M., CT. Martine, A.M. Latimer, & S.A. Leicht-Young 2007. Invasive plants and their ecological strategies: prediction and explanation of woody plant invasion in New England. Diversity and Distributions 13(5):633-644.